Floyd fans tickled Pink by Waters!



Roger Waters played every bit the legend June 23 at the Saddledome, leaving fans comfortably numb with the classic music of Pink Floyd.
Robin Kuniski, Sun Media

Sun Media
June 23th 2007
CA Calgary AB
Pengrowth Saddledome


By Robin Kuniski:
If you never got to see Pink Floyd in concert, catching Roger Waters is the next best thing.

 

His Dark Side of the Moon Tour, which came to Calgary June 23, has all the makings of a Floyd spectacle — an inflatable pig, a prism made from lasers and, of course, some of the best music of all time.

 

With the exception of 2005’s reunion at Live 8, the wildly successful British psychedelic rock band has ceased to exist. Rumours of them getting back together, while persistent, are likely wishful thinking.

 

So Floyd’s main songwriter/bass player and vocalist’s latest tour truly is a fan’s only option.

 

And, based on the ’Dome show last night, it’s a phenomenal one.

 

Book-ended by numbers from 1979’s The Wall, the concert was made up of three sections — highlights from Waters’ solo career, 1973’s Dark Side of the Moon played in its entirety, and an encore (after press time) which was to include Another Brick in The Wall and Comfortably Numb.

 

In front of 12,000 fans, the 62-year-old, along with his talented 10-piece band, kicked things off with In the Flesh as images of hammers flashed on the big screen.

 

After Mother and a slow Set Controls for the Heart of the Sun, came an early highlight as the band moved into Shine On You Crazy Diamond.

 

Bubbles of soap rained from the ceiling and a photo of Floyd founding member Syd Barrett was projected above the stage as Waters, backed by three female vocalists, showcased the tune.

 

The rest of the first 70-minute set included an upbeat Have a Cigar and crowd-favourite Wish You Were Here.

 

Then, after a quick break, Waters — looking healthy and in fine voice — returned to showcase Dark Side of the Moon, one of the best selling albums of our time.

 

With the band in full swing, guitars wailing and keyboards rocking, the album’s howling sound effects and political themes soared. The entire set was both captivating and hypnotic — the crowd responding by belting out the words like they had been written just for them.

 

Many appeared to be in awe of the material, or at least at the fact they were actually hearing it played live. This was a sentiment heard over and over during the show’s intermission.

 

There were few complaints.

 

In fact, the only thing this concert slightly lacked was movement by its headliner.

 

After decades in front of crowds, Waters still seemed slightly uncomfortable working the stage. When not behind the mic, he spent his time off to the side, playing bass. He seemed content to let the music speak for him.

 

And with a catalog of such enormity and influence, one can hardly blame him.